News

GUS data from Birth Cohort 1 Sweep 8 is now available from the UK data service. The data features interviews with children in their first term of Primary 6, and is made up of interviews with carers, children, and cognitive tests. Click here to find out more.

News

Read this article by GUS researcher Line Knudsed in the Parenting Across Scotland newsletter.

News

New report from Skafida and Chambers on the positive association between sugar consumption and dental decay prevalence independent of oral hygiene in pre-school children.

Read here.

News

This report draws on data from Birth Cohort 1 (BC1) and Birth Cohort 2 (BC2) combined with administrative data from the Care Inspectorate to provide an understanding of characteristics of early learning and childcare (ELC) use and provision in Scotland.

Read full report

News

Read a blog from ScotCen researcher Eilidh Currie on GUS’s achievements in 2017. 

Publication

This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) longitudinal study to investigate the employment patterns of mothers during the first 5 years of their child’s life. The analysis draws on data relating to children in 2 birth cohorts: Birth Cohort 1 (BC1), children born in 2004/5 and Birth Cohort 2 (BC2), children born in 2010/11. Surveys were conducted when the children were aged 10 months, 3 years and 5 years, spanning the period 2005 – 2015.

Read full report

Publication

Data from the second sweep of GUS Birth Cohort 2 (6,000 children born 2010/11) is now available from the UK Data Service.

For a user guide for the data, click here.

For a deposit form, click here.

If you are using the data or plan to do so, please keep in touch by e-mailing Comms@natcen.ac.uk. It is important for to us to monitor how the data is being used to demonstrate the impact of the study.

Publication

The Scottish Government has published a new report ‘Objectively measured physical activity levels of Scottish children: analysis from a sub-sample of 10-11 year-olds in the Growing Up in Scotland study’.

Link to the full report.  

This report uses GUS data to explore the physical activity and sedentary levels in Scottish 10-11 year old children. Using two approaches, self-reported and objectively measured physical activity, the analysis examines differences in activity levels by gender and area deprivation. 

The report was written by Paul McCrorie and Anne Ellaway from the Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow. This work part of a wider academic study exploring the environmental determinants of physical activity in young people that also incorporates GPS data on where young people are most active (SPACES – Studying Physical Activity in Children’s Environments Across Scotland).

Publication

A new report published by the Scottish Government explores the quality of father-child relationships as perceived by children aged 10 years old, the factors predicting less positive father-child relationships, and how father-child relationships relate to other aspects of children’s wellbeing.

Download the report

The report was commissioned by the Scottish Government as part of Year of the Dad 2016. The report was written by Alison Parkes, Julie Riddell, Daniel Wight and Katie Buston at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow

 

 

Publication

A new report published by the Scottish Government explores the relationships between parent-child activities and language development and enjoyment of reading in two of the groups of children taking part in GUS.

The report compares language development at age 3 and explores whether any differences are linked to changes in early parent-child activities across the two cohorts. The report also explores whether any changes in home learning activities across the cohorts appear to be linked to the introduction of the Scottish Book Trust’s Bookbug programme and the Scottish Government’s PlayTalkRead campaign.

Click on the link below to read the report:

Language development and enjoyment of reading: impacts of early parent-child activities in two Growing Up in Scotland cohorts

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